Rangers – By Jeff Carter, Head Golf Professional

The Ranger serves a very important purpose throughout your round of golf, even though it may not always seem so. To that end, I would like to give you an explanation of their duties, discuss Pace of Play, and provide a little insight into why they do what they do.

The pace a round of golf at Spring Run Golf Club has been established at Four Hours and Seventeen minutes (4:17) by the Florida State Golf Association rating team.  The Florida State Golf Association rates the difficulty of the hole, the driving distance from the green to the next tee, and time it takes to make the turn, eat some food, and use the facilities.  Each hole has an established time for a foursome to complete the hole.  For instance, on hole #4: when the flagstick is located on the back left, it will take longer to play than if the flagstick is located on the front right.  That is why you may see more than two groups on that hole: it is due to the tough pin position.

Back in 2014, the average round of golf was four hours and forty-five minutes (4:45). The average round this year so far has been (4:17).


When the Ranger arrives at the club in the morning, their first duty is to get their cart out of the cart barn, pick up the tee sheet, and see if any cart restrictions are in place.  Each Ranger cart is supplied with extra tees, pencils, scorecards, towels, green repair tools, and a first aid kit.  Every Ranger has been certified in CPR as well.

They proceed out on the course to make sure the restrooms on the course are well supplied and clean. If trash is overflowing, they will empty it. They provide a light cleaning until our Day Porter, Josefina, makes it out to the comfort stations for a more thorough cleaning.

Once they have completed their rounds, it is time to monitor the Golf Course.  The Ranger’s cart has the GPS screen that shows the location and pace of each group.  If a group starts to slow 5 minutes behind schedule, they will immediately go to that group and ask the group to speed up and get back on schedule.  Just this year alone, Rangers have moved over 15 groups to get in position.  They have full authority to move groups on non-league days, though only Scott or myself will move groups on league days due to the penalty shots.  We will not move a group until after the groups receives the first warning; however, if they are still behind after the warning, we will move the group where they should be located on the course.

What are they doing there?

Normally when you see the Ranger sitting in his cart between the fifth and seventh hole, they are monitoring groups that have been behind pace, and informing the members behind the slow foursome that the pace will be improving.  From this location, they can monitor the three holes around them.

Where are they?

Some complain that pace is slow because they haven’t seen a Ranger all day.  With the GPS monitor, they can see your group. If your group is on pace, they will go to other parts of the course where they are needed to speed up play.  The Golf Shop is monitoring three GPS screens as well, observing pace of play. They will inform a Ranger where to go to expedite play.

The Rangers are often bringing members out on the course who were late, or bringing members off the course if they are not feeling well. Sometimes there is an emergency at home.  They are locating lost clubs and bringing them to the player who lost it.  They also direct play on shotguns as to how get to a certain hole on the course.

I will be having training sessions with the Rangers on how to talk to the members on the course. We want to be better able to communicate to you so that all our members can enjoy their round. If you read my monthly article in the News on the Run, you may recall I always sign with “Play Well and Play Fast.”

Certainly, you will experience slow days out on the course, but just remember that we are constantly striving to help improve the pace of play, communicate more effectively, and ensure that you enjoy your round.

Play Well and Play Fast




Dear Spring Run Owner,

Despite several reports at Board Meetings and even the most recent Neighborhood Representatives Meeting this past Tuesday, the rumor of a Hurricane assessment persists. Just this morning, another concerned owner stopped by the office to confirm the charge. I informed him that there will be NO hurricane assessment to the Membership following the damage from Irma.

Spring Run’s hurricane deductible came out to $412,000. Our expenses came close but as of this time, have not exceeded it. Despite that, we did receive Insurance proceeds of $250,000, and we had reserved $50,000 for hurricane damage, leaving us with approximately $100,000 in expenses to the Club. The Board felt strongly that due to the assessments for damage in other neighborhoods, we could handle this cost and provide some relief to our owners.

Please help spread the word.

Thank you


Speed Bumps

Dear Spring Run Member,

Its another article discussing the oft-maligned speed bump, a necessity for the safety of pedestrians, cyclists, and frankly other drivers in a community without sidewalks, yet a nuisance for others who feel they are not needed. I certainly do not like to hit speedbumps on any roadway, but if you approach them gently, you’ll hardly notice.

The purpose of today’s article is to simply raise your awareness of the new configuration of the speed bumps, and to remind you NOT to try to fit your wheels between them. According to Fire Marshall Green, six years ago, the Florida Fire Prevention Code was changed, but it took several years to get it officially into the Village’s ordinances, which recognize EFR’s authority over the design of traffic calming devices. The Village met with Shayne and I to review the specs, which were designed to accommodate the double rear wheels of the Fire Trucks, which are wider than the front ones. Interestingly, it is does not accommodate Ambulances, as they are essentially a big pickup truck or van.  Those wheel bases are the same as a regular passenger vehicle, so unfortunately, they still hit bumps. But, as the Fire Marshall relayed to me, making the separation between bumps close enough to accommodate ambulances, and thus, all traffic,  defeats the purpose of having traffic calming devices.

Which brings me to my main point. Please DO NOT try to drive your car’s wheels between the openings of the bumps. They won’t both fit, even if one does. The main problem here is that in order to position your vehicle to attempt to navigate the openings, you are likely moving your car out of your lane and into oncoming vehicles. Not only will you hit the bump with at least one wheel, you may hit another car.

Remember the speed limit in the community is 19 MPH.

Thank you!



2018 Elections are right around the Corner!

Have you considered running for the Spring Run Board of Directors?

Perhaps you know someone who would be a good candidate?

Feel free to let Vince Corso, Chairman of the Nominating Committee, know your thoughts.

A notice of Elections will go out mid-January detailing the schedule, deadlines for submission, and other pertinent information.

If you have any questions, please contact Mike Zigler.

Happy New Year!



Rakes in or Rakes out of Bunkers?

Dear Members,

Rakes in or Rakes out of Bunkers?  

The following is an excerpt from the USGA’s “Rules and Decisions”

“Question:  Should rakes be placed in or outside bunkers?

Answer:  There is not a perfect answer for the position of rakes, but on balance it is felt there is less likelihood of an advantage or disadvantage to the player if rakes are placed outside bunkers.

It may be argued that there is more likelihood of a ball being deflected into or kept out of a bunker if the rake is placed outside the bunker.  It could also be argued that if the rake is in the bunker it is most unlikely that the ball will be deflected out of the bunker.

However, in practice, players who leave rakes in bunkers frequently leave them at the side which tends to stop a ball rolling into the flat part of the bunker, resulting in a much more difficult shot than would otherwise have been the case.  This is most prevalent at a course where the bunkers are small.  When the ball comes to rest on or against a rake in the bunker and the player must proceed under Rule 24-1, it may not be possible to replace the ball on the same spot or find a spot in the bunker which is not nearer the hole.

If rakes are left in the middle of the bunker the only way to position them is to throw them into the bunker and this causes damage to the surface.  Also, if a rake is in the middle of a large bunker it is either not used or the player is obliged to rake a large area of the bunker resulting in unnecessary delay.

Therefore, after considering all these aspects, it is recommended that rakes should be left outside bunkers in areas where they are least likely to affect the movement of the ball.

Ultimately, it is a matter for the Committee to decide where it wishes rakes to be placed.”

And the Committee says “outside”!

Also, it has come to my attention that some members feel we are only going to renovate a few bunkers, or maybe just the greenside ones. The plan is that ALL bunkers will be replaced with the Bunker Solutions material. It is so cost-effective and  erosion-resistant, it wouldn’t make sense to leave any undone, given that the crew needs to fix them all after a downpour.

Feel free to reply with any questions.



Golf Course Notes

You may wonder why there is a piece of equipment sitting in the rough on hole #10. Unfortunately, the rough unit sprung a hydraulic line leak, spilling fluid onto the turf. We are awaiting the delivery of a new hose, and it should be fixed tomorrow. In the meantime, the maintenance crew is flushing the area with water to move the hydraulic fluid through the soil. This will minimize the damage and to help the turf recover. It will turn brown for a while, but then the grass will grow back.

The greenside bunker on hole #18 should be completed later today or tomorrow. Regardless, the MGA will play the actual green tomorrow with the bunker marked “Ground Under Repair”. This will end the greenside bunker renovation for this season. We will start again in May with Hole #1 –greenside bunker. Throughout season, the crew will be renovating some out-of-the way fairway bunkers while golf continues.



Shopping at Golf Guys? Don’t forget to charge it back to the Club!

Dear Spring Run Member,

It has been brought to our attention that some members are using their credit cards instead of charging back to their club account when making a purchase at Golf Guys. Tell the counter associate your name and that you are a member of Spring Run, and they will send the transaction to us. In the  event that the associate is unaware of this policy, please let us know immediately.

Since Golf Guys is now handling our merchandising, there is no difference in price between their shop and ours. So purchasing there with your credit card offers no savings. The pricing that we now have comes from the buying power we get through our agreement with them. Charging back to the Club ensures we get credit for the sale, further ensuring that our pricing stays low. In addition, the Club gets commission on all golf equipment and attire purchased at either our own Golf Shop or at the Golf Guys Store. If you use your card at their store, the Club does not get credit for the sale.

Have questions? Please reply. Thank you!